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Jon Batiste and Stay Human on 'The Colbert Report' (Video)

Alex Marianyi
Staff Writer
alex.marianyi[at]gmail.com / @alexmarianyi

Last night, bandleader Jon Batiste and his band Stay Human brought the Colbert Report audience to the streets. In the interview, Colbert asks the kind of questions we’ve come to expect: "Is there a fair amount of nudity in your family?" But Batiste got the chance to playfully fire back by implying that Colbert relies on scripts. Most of the segment focused on jazz as an American music, how jazz is a "social music" (the term that titles Batiste's most recent album), and what that all means.

After the commercial break, Stay Human came out and joined Batiste in a lively version of "Express Yourself". Kicking the piano stool out from under him, Batiste danced off the stage where he and the band collected the audience in a second line style march out onto the street. There was a smile on every face, a dance move in every pair of legs, and a little bit of New Orleans in New York City. Check out video from the interview and the outstanding (literally) performance from Colbert's site after the jump.

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Sean Jones - 'im.pro.vise - never before seen'

Ben Gray
Contributing Writer
bengray417@gmail.com

Sean Jones' recently released im.pro.vise - never before seen, on Mack Avenue Records, is a crisp suit of an album, cufflinks in the sleeves. The quartet of Jones on trumpet, Orrin Evans on piano, Luques Curtis on bass, and Obed Calvaire on drums create a sound that is built on a foundation that includes quite a few bricks from Miles' late-1960's period (as Jones' "ESP"-quoting solo on "Dark Times" can attest), it also builds on the sound of the Wynton Marsalis' 1980's output and the other Young Lions of the time (appropriate, given Jones' tenure with Marsalis in the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra). For a music that lives and dies by the drum, the presence of Obed Calvaire is always a good sign (see also: the SFJAZZ Collective and The Clayton Brothers, among others). Likewise, the presence of Christian McBride as one of the album's producers is a good sign, and portends the no-nonsense, good-feeling, straight-ahead jazz on im.pro.vise.

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DJ Harrison - 'Stashboxxx'

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-in-Chief
anthony.deanharris@nextbop.com / @i_ADH

For the 21st century jazz musician whose varied interests keep a lot of irons in the fire, keyboardist/producer/newfound record label mogul Devonne Harris in his latest release has walked a very fine line between jazz album and beat tape. With Stashboxxx, Harris turns the fuzzy feeling that runs throughout every Butcher Brown (for which Harris is part of the Richmond, VA, quartet on the rise) release and concentrates it into pure boom-bap psychedelia. It's the kind of beat tape, much like drummer Karriem Riggins' 2012 Stones Throw release Alone Together, that's playful about its song & beat construction and clearly coming from a musician with catholic ears. Check out DJ Harrison's short movie for Stashboxxx featuring quite a few cuts from the album after the jump.

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The Line-Up for 25 July 2014

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-in-Chief
anthony.deanharris@nextbop.com / @i_ADH

This week celebrates Brian Blade's birthday, premieres a song from the amazing new Eric Harland's Voyager album, and brings the new as usual for your enjoyment.

The Line-Up for 25 July 2014

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Marc Cary Focus Trio & Friends - "Sound Portals" (Download)

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-in-Chief
anthony.deanharris@nextbop.com / @i_ADH

Pianist/keyboardist Marc Cary has been releasing songs from download from his Bandcamp each month for a pay what you want rate (with as low to free) for a few months now, and each track is great, making its own aural explorations. It would seem the song for each month goes through as many permutations as Cary has made in his various larger works in his career. Today, he and his Focus Trio of bassist Burniss Earl Travis and drummer/percussionist Sameer Gupta release "Sound Portals", a shifting song based on a North Indian Raga. It's an amazing nine-minute journey in sound that you should definitely check out and cop after the jump.