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For Your Consideration: Lionel Loueke's 'Heritage'

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-in-Chief
anthony.deanharris@nextbop.com / @i_ADH

Benin-native guitarist Lionel Loueke always seemed to make music with a distinctly different sonic palette from the rest of us. Much of that may have to do with his African roots, instilling in Loueke the kinds of tinkling arpeggios, clicks, and clacks that just aren't common in the western world, yet it's this special aural paint that makes his body of work so remarkable. Through the years, Loueke's sound has harbored a bevy of collaborators (especially a constantly satisfying working rapport with vocalist Gretchen Parlato) and even more acclaim. It would seem only natural that his glitchy (in a vocal, almost Al Jarreau in his heyday kind of variety) sounds would sidle along nicely with the infectious philosophy of groove of pianist Robert Glasper. By their powers combined (along with bassist Derrick Hodge and drummer Mark Guiliana), they have released Heritage, out now on the Blue Note label (ahem, Amazon, ahem, iTunes).

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Bootlegs of Glasper, Palladino, & Dave at Ginny's Supper Club

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-in-Chief
anthony.deanharris@nextbop.com / @i_ADH

The relatively new Ginny's Supper Club in Harlem is quickly making a name for itself, especially when it features class act sets from the likes of Robert Glasper, the legendary Pino Palladino, and Chris "Daddy" Dave. The trio performed a couple weeks ago at the club beneath the Red Rooster (put on by our friends at Revive Da Live) with a set featuring appearances from saxophonist Marcus Strickland and vocalists Jose James, Taylor McFerrin, and Bilal. The bootlegs from the performance are streaming here.

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The Line-Up for 24 August 2012

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-in-Chief
anthony.deanharris@nextbop.com / @i_ADH

I have a lot of new goodies for this week's show. It's exciting. The playlist for this week feels like Christmas. I never even saw such a bounty of riches coming. There's mad crazy new stuff. I can go on and on about it but I'll just play music now.

The Line-Up for 17 August 2012

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The Bad Plus' 'Made Possible' Out Next Month

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-in-Chief
anthony.deanharris@nextbop.com / @i_ADH

Whispers have been spreading around the internet in the last few days about a new album from The Bad Plus releasing soon. Well, IFC just posted a video of the EPK for the trio's new album, Made Possible, releasing next month (though it's embeded after the jump).

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The (Blank) of Our Time

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-in-Chief
anthony.deanharris@nextbop.com / @i_ADH

Yesterday, I fell prey to a little bit of shoddy writing. Not that I'm at all displeased with how my FYC of ERIMAJ's Conflict of a Man turned out (though I'll clearly be listening to the album significantly more often than I'll be reading my review, and you should too). However, I'm finding it a little difficult working comparisons to other artists out of my system. In the piece, I compared Jamire Williams' group to the chameleonic band The Crusaders, founded in Texas in the 1950s and still going strong. Considering my adoration of all things Joe Sample, my claim was high praise, but it still feels like a cop out sometimes to say an artist is the (blank) of our time, especially if the blank is still walking around. Yet, can this device also be a helpful descriptor? For the sake of contextualization, I felt it helpful to compare ERIMAJ to The Crusaders. When we refer to the present in the terms of the past (or a prior era of a still-present present [I know, I know. Just please bear with me.]), how much of a disservice is being done?