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On Semiotics

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-in-Chief
anthony.deanharris@nextbop.com / @i_ADH

To begin, I'd like to start with an apology for missing posting yesterday. Because yesterday was American Independance Day, I took a break from the site. I understand that the site has quite the international following (and yet I seem never to back down from idiomatic phrases, so I thank all of you who follow my sprawling trains of thought everyday) and, at times, I felt pangs of guilt for taking the day off unannounced. I'm sorry if you were expecting some jazz news or feature yesterday. We're all still working back here. I should have said something.

On Tuesday, Andisheh Nouraee, writer for Creative Loafing Atlanta among other publications and author of Americapedia: Taking the Dumb Out of Freedom, wrote a moving piece on the importance of properly acknowledging American Independence Day as opposed to trivializing it to simply "the 4th". An underlying point Nouraee was making throughout the piece is how our names for things point to our value of them, the relationship between the signifier and the signified. When I read the piece, it didn't take long for my mind to wander to the same point Aaron Sorkin was making in this last week's episode of his new HBO series, The Newsroom (I might have mentioned it before). During a preparatory interview practice, a young associate producer, Maggie, schools her senior producer, Jim, about how considering the extreme lengths people around the world take to immigrate to America, those who do so illegitimately should be referred to with a much more dignified term than "illegals". How we refer to things matter because they are linked in some ways to how we feel about those things, the relationship between the signifier and the signified.

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Alan Evans Trio to Start U.S. Tour

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-in-Chief
anthony.deanharris@nextbop.com / @i_ADH


[Listen to Alan Evans in the Nextplayer]

The Alan Evans Trio is about to go on tour next month in support of their latest album, Drop Hop, in what will aptly be called the "US Drop and Run Tour". The group will hit up 25 stops throughout the United States through August and September with a final stop at the Bear Creek Festival in Florida this November. Check out the dates after the jump and roll through if the trio comes to town.

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Festival International de Jazz de Montreal, Day 1: Richard Galliano

From Bach to Piazzolla
Justin Wee
Co-Founder
j.wee@nextbop.com

For this first festival day, Montrealers were able to attend the opening concert given by Richard Galliano and his musicians. The French accordionist was surrounded by a string quintet for compositional travel between J. S. Bach and Astor Piazzolla, via some personal compositions and "tunes of Paris," in his own words. If the program appeared at the outset to be an eclectic mix, the result lived up to those expectations.

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The Line-Up for 29 June 2012

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-in-Chief
anthony.deanharris@nextbop.com / @i_ADH

You know those sort of weird disjointed songs that you sort of like but have to find the right mood to play? That's what this week's show is all about. The name of the game is "angular".

The Line-Up for 29 June 2012

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On Authorial Voice and Personal Taste

Anthony Dean-Harris
Editor-in-Chief
anthony.deanharris@nextbop.com / @i_ADH

The talk of the internet this week is all about the premiere of Aaron Sorkin's new television series, The Newsroom. The series which revolves around a fictional cable news show in a very real 2010 is boilerplate Sorkin-- rapidfire, erudite, pitter-pat speech; conversation in hallways; multi-generational drama with a twinge of humor from the gap; an on again/off again romance that we have to see inexplicably in the pilot; and platitudes, platitudes, platitudes. Yeah, it's not everyone's kind of show and it is a bit of an obvious pattern by now but I just eat this kind of stuff up with a spoon. It's just so rich. It'd be like eating cheesecake everyday.1 Maybe it's because I wish I lived in a world where people talked like they do on an Aaron Sorkin (or Amy Sherman-Palladino or David E. Kelley) show that I'm not all that bothered by Sorkin's characters' implausible need to preach about values with sanded-off edges. I happen to like his authorial voice.